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Write Wedding Invites Your Guests Will Love

Hosting a wedding is a huge amount of work and you have a ton of stuff to take care of. But in the midst of all the work, don’t forget to write some solid wedding invites. Follow this guide to write some wedding invites your guests will love.

The host line

“It used to be the tradition that the bride’s parents hosted the wedding. But you shouldn’t feel pressured to follow this tradition if you don’t want to. It’s become common for both parents to host the wedding,” recommends Phil Smith, writer at Top Canadian Writers. Many couples host their wedding or host it together with their parents, so do whatever makes you comfortable. An example of this last scenario would be “Together with their parents, Sarah and Thomas…” If a parent is deceased, they can still be included in the host line. An example for this would be “Sarah, daughter of Donald Jones and the late Cathy Jones…”

The request line

There are a few variations to the request line, but it’s pretty basic. The most common is “request the honor of your presence,” for a wedding hosted in a religious venue. If your wedding will be secular then “request the pleasure of your company” is more appropriate. This part will be followed up by “at the wedding of their daughter,” if the bride’s parents are hosting, “at the wedding of their son,” if the groom’s parents are hosting, or if the couple is hosting, some variant of “as they exchange vows.”

Names

Begin with the bride’s name, on her line, followed by the groom’s. These two lines are joined by either “and” or “or” depending on which one will flow best with your writing. Traditionally the bride’s first and middle name are used, and the groom’s first and last name. You can break with tradition and add the bride’s last name and the groom’s middle name if you like. The reason the bride’s last name is usually left off is that traditionally the bride’s parent would have hosted, and she had the same last name.

Other information

Write out the date beginning with the day of the week, the date, and the month (Sunday, the third of May.) Write out the year (two-thousand and eighteen) and time (two o’clock in the afternoon.) For the location, begin with the name of the venue, followed by the city and state (St. Mark’s Cathedral, Philadelphia, PA.) Generally, the street address is not included, unless it would be confusing to leave it off. Don’t forget to include where the reception will be hosted, when it will begin, and some information on what will be served. Should people expect a full meal or just cocktails? Will there be dancing? It’s polite to let your guests know what to expect.

Write better invitations with help from some online resources

People are going to remember your wedding invitations for a long time. So, it’s best to make a good impression with an eloquent and well-written stationary. Check out these resources for help writing yours:

  1. WritingPopulist and SimpleGrad – Make sure the grammar is perfect for your wedding invitations. These grammar resources can help ensure everything written is correct. Don’t take any chances with your wedding invitations.
  2. UKWritings and Academized – These are both online proofreading tools that have been suggested by UKServicesReviews. Proofreading isn’t exactly easy to do well, so get some help from the professionals. Nobody wants a typo on their wedding invitation.
  3. LetsGoandLearn and StudentWritingServices – Check out these useful writing blogs. They are full of posts that can help you with any form of writing, including your wedding invitations.

Conclusion

There’s a lot to do when you’re getting ready for your wedding. Be sure to take the time and get your wedding invites right.

Grace Carter is a contributor to Essayroo and Australian Help services. She helps with content proofreading, reviews submissions and manages freelance editors. Also, Grace is a tutor at Assignment Writing Service, academic website.

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Grace Carter

Grace Carter is a contributor to Essayroo and Australian Help services. She helps with content proofreading, reviews submissions and manages freelance editors. Also, Grace is a tutor at Assignment Writing Service, academic website.

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